A Look at the Latest Automation in Heavy Industries

A Look at the Latest Automation in Heavy Industries

2019 is shaping up to be a pivotal moment in the ongoing evolution of industrial robots. In the US especially, as companies face greater pressure to reshore jobs while at the same time competing with cheaper overseas labor, collaborative, autonomous, and highly dexterous robots represent a welcome compromise. They’re not replacing us — yet — but they’re definitely helping us do all kinds of work faster, safer, and more efficiently.

Read the full article in The Boss Magazine.

Seven Things You Need To Know About IIoT In Manufacturing

Seven Things You Need To Know About IIoT In Manufacturing

Global spending on IIoT Platforms for Manufacturing is predicted to grow from $1.67B in 2018 to $12.44B in 2024, attaining a 40% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) in seven years.

  • IIoT platforms are beginning to replace MES and related applications, including production maintenance, quality, and inventory management, which are a mix of Information Technology (IT) and Operations Technology (OT) technologies.

  • Connected IoT technologies are enabling a new era of smart, connected products that often expand on the long-proven platforms of everyday products. Capgemini estimates that the size of the connected products market will be $519B to $685B by 2020.

    Read the full article in Forbes.

How to Make Your First Robot Integration a Success

How to Make Your First Robot Integration a Success

Across the United States, small and medium-sized manufacturers (SMMs) are contemplating integrating industrial robots into their facilities. There is a growing awareness that increasingly flexible and affordable robotics systems can help existing workers in a variety of different ways, taking on repetitive tasks and freeing up staff for higher level work and increasing productivity overall.

To serve this growing need, dozens of robotics systems integrators have come online and promise complete packages to guide manufacturers from initial assessment to fully realized industrial automation. But deferring to these experts can feel a little imposing to manufacturers who rely on established processes they’ve developed internally.

Read the full article in Manufacturing.Net.

Is the Supply Chain Ready for Robots?

Is the Supply Chain Ready for Robots?

Each chapter of the Industrial Revolution reveals a common ebb and flow in the number and makeup of jobs. As early as the steam engine, innovation displaced certain workers with new ones who, for example, had cognitive skills like creativity and problem-solving. This will continue with robots. According to the World Economic Forum, by 2022, the shifting labor division between humans, machines and algorithms will result in 75 million lost job roles, but an addition of 133 million job roles, netting 58 million.

Read the full article in Manufacturing.net.

Next-Generation Manufacturing Technology Sets Early-Adopters Up for Success

Next-Generation Manufacturing Technology Sets Early-Adopters Up for Success

One-third of manufacturers are using management dashboards and 67 percent are using sales analytics for management insight—and the use of analytics is expected to grow 20 percent. The huge opportunity is to leverage operational data for more control and visibility across the organization. 

Read the full article in Industry Week.

7 Amazing Examples of Digital Twin Technology In Practice

7 Amazing Examples of Digital Twin Technology In Practice

Wouldn't it be extraordinary to simulate plans or build what-if scenarios for the products, facilities, and processes you wished to change before you actually put real-world resources behind real-world implementation? That's the promise of digital twins. And, many businesses and industries are taking advantage of this promise as these 7 amazing examples of digital twin technology illustrate. 

Read the full article in Forbes.

How Data Can Be Monetized in Core Manufacturing Operations

How Data Can Be Monetized in Core Manufacturing Operations

In general, manufacturing operations collect more than enough data to form a basis for the initial stages of transformation. The challenge is that many may not have a clear idea of how to use it or cannot easily access it because it is locked in legacy systems. And simply accessing that data is not enough – organizations must be able to monetize it.

Read the full article in CIO.

Why Software Will Drive the Smart Factory and the Future of Manufacturing

Why Software Will Drive the Smart Factory and the Future of Manufacturing

The manufacturing industry is seeing a turning-point in its growth and development, moving from decades-old operational processes to new implementations of IoT and connected technology such as smart robotics and industrial systems. A report from Statista reports that the smart manufacturing market is expected to grow to approximately $480 billion USD by 2023, from just a few hundred billion in 2018. As more systems become connected, the industrial and manufacturing industries, as well as the whole supply chain, must continue to mature to give manufacturers a set of tools for optimizing and increasing efficiencies in their connected factories that help them compete in the market and ultimately enable greater innovation.

Read the full article in Manufacturing.net.

What To Consider When Choosing Grippers

What To Consider When Choosing Grippers

Automated manufacturing operations are finely tuned ecosystems in which all components must function in complete harmony. Grippers used to pick and place, orient and hold components or end products at various points along the production chain are key to this process.

Read the full article in Advanced Manufacturing.

For 3D Systems, The Future Of 3-D Manufacturing Is Today

For 3D Systems, The Future Of 3-D Manufacturing Is Today

Some industry reports say Additive Manufacturing (AM) will render all other manufacturing obsolete. While that’s almost certainly overblown, at least for the foreseeable future, there’s no doubt that additive for production manufacturing has arrived.  Read the full article in Forbes.

Advanced Robotics Versus Practical Robotics

Advanced Robotics Versus Practical Robotics

e these issues. Once a practical application is identified with a big enough market, practical roboticists focus on using the technology at hand and adding more customization to create a solution for automating these tasks. Commercializing robotics helps in advancing the science of robotics. The advanced robotics engineers, without realizing it, are highly dependent on practical roboticists for their future survival.

Read the full article in Forbes.

5 Ways to Turn Smart Manufacturing Awareness Into Execution

5 Ways to Turn Smart Manufacturing Awareness Into Execution

Industry 4.0 and digital transformation bring with them smart factories and smart manufacturing units, which are fully integrated, collaborative manufacturing systems capable of adapting to supplier and customer needs in real time. The latest technologies in Internet of Things (IoT), cloud computing, data analytics and artificial intelligence are forming an integral part of this digital-driven industry.

INTERVIEW: FAST RADIUS’ CEO LOU RASSEY ON EMBRACING INDUSTRIAL ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING

INTERVIEW: FAST RADIUS’ CEO LOU RASSEY ON EMBRACING INDUSTRIAL ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING

Now that 3D printing is moving towards industrial-grade production levels, many companies find themselves excited about the possibilities but not sure how to fully make it part of their operating model. This has created a gap where companies are slow to adopt additive manufacturing. Fast Radius’ CEO Lou Rassey shares his take on industrial additive manufacturing.

Read the full article in 3D Printing Industry.

On-Premises or the Cloud: Which Makes More Sense?

On-Premises or the Cloud: Which Makes More Sense?

In your digital transformation, remember that every plant is different, so you need to find the right balance of local and cloud platforms. When you are choosing a platform to collect and visualize data, make sure the system has the flexibility to meet your particular requirements.

Read the full article in Advanced Manufacturing.

Turning Traditional Automation On Its Head

Turning Traditional Automation On Its Head

Manufacturing automation is trickling down from the massive automotive assembly lines toward the “mom and pop” machine shop. As you take your first look at automation, consider the benefits of and barriers to this technology. Traditional automation requires a large upfront investment in dedicated equipment that takes months or even years to implement. Expanding automated solutions to more manufacturers doesn’t just require a better mousetrap, but also a paradigm shift to break down the old barriers. Systems integrators are creating solutions for manufacturers that reduce initial investment, shorten implementation times and allow for greater flexibility from the get-go.

Read the full article in Advanced Manufacturing.

RAPID-ROI AUTOMATION FOR FOOD MANUFACTURING — NO ENGINEER REQUIRED

RAPID-ROI AUTOMATION FOR FOOD MANUFACTURING — NO ENGINEER REQUIRED

Today’s collaborative robots (“cobots”) quickly, easily, and cost-effectively automate secondary food-handling processes such as quality control, labeling, packaging, and palletizing. They’re easy to program with no engineering experience, and they can typically pay for themselves in less than a year.

How Machine Learning Improves Manufacturing Inspections, Product Quality & Supply Chain Visibility

How Machine Learning Improves Manufacturing Inspections, Product Quality & Supply Chain Visibility

Manufacturing is the most data-prolific industry there is, generating on average 1.9 petabytes of data every year according to the McKinsey Global Insititute. Supply chains, sourcing, factory operations, and the phases of compliance and quality management generate the majority of data.