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Virtual and Augmented Reality in Manufacturing

Virtual and Augmented Reality in Manufacturing

Both virtual and augmented reality show potential to decrease manufacturing costs and increase safety and productivity. VR is currently used by forward-thinking manufacturers to improve their approach to predictive analytics, and AR is being used to facilitate maintenance and deliver expert support remotely.

Read the full article in Manufacturing.net.

Best Practices Meant for the Whole Digital Transformation

Best Practices Meant for the Whole Digital Transformation

As with any digital transformation process, the devil is in the details, and there are many potential pitfalls that can derail projects. These include:

  • Proof of concepts (PoCs) not grounded in business issues and lacking definable and measurable business benefits prevent advancement beyond the PoC phase.

  • Scatter-gun technology deployments based on telling a good investor story rather than considering their cumulative effect on the business. This can lead to implementing the wrong technology at the wrong time without any positive material impact on operations or profitability.

  • The lack of organizational technology familiarity and skill sets to effectively manage, implement and control the cost of deployments can lead to spiraling timelines and poor ROI.

  • An unfamiliar provider environment and convoluted technology supplier ecosystem can lead to disastrous partner choices.

These Brands Are Making Age-Old Camping Gear With Modern Design And Manufacturing Techniques

These Brands Are Making Age-Old Camping Gear With Modern Design And Manufacturing Techniques

According to the 2017 American Camper Report from the Outdoor Foundation, more than 40.1 million Americans went camping at least one night in 2016, with an average annual spend of $546.41 per person on gear and supplies. That makes camping and backpacking a lucrative industry, with brands aiming to be on the cutting edge of technology and convenience to attract a piece of the multi-million dollar pie. Nowadays, camping has gone high-tech, with several brands introducing new and innovative products for 2019.

Read the full article in Forbes.

Seven Things You Need To Know About IIoT In Manufacturing

Seven Things You Need To Know About IIoT In Manufacturing

Global spending on IIoT Platforms for Manufacturing is predicted to grow from $1.67B in 2018 to $12.44B in 2024, attaining a 40% compound annual growth rate (CAGR) in seven years.

  • IIoT platforms are beginning to replace MES and related applications, including production maintenance, quality, and inventory management, which are a mix of Information Technology (IT) and Operations Technology (OT) technologies.

  • Connected IoT technologies are enabling a new era of smart, connected products that often expand on the long-proven platforms of everyday products. Capgemini estimates that the size of the connected products market will be $519B to $685B by 2020.

    Read the full article in Forbes.

Is the Supply Chain Ready for Robots?

Is the Supply Chain Ready for Robots?

Each chapter of the Industrial Revolution reveals a common ebb and flow in the number and makeup of jobs. As early as the steam engine, innovation displaced certain workers with new ones who, for example, had cognitive skills like creativity and problem-solving. This will continue with robots. According to the World Economic Forum, by 2022, the shifting labor division between humans, machines and algorithms will result in 75 million lost job roles, but an addition of 133 million job roles, netting 58 million.

Read the full article in Manufacturing.net.

Next-Generation Manufacturing Technology Sets Early-Adopters Up for Success

Next-Generation Manufacturing Technology Sets Early-Adopters Up for Success

One-third of manufacturers are using management dashboards and 67 percent are using sales analytics for management insight—and the use of analytics is expected to grow 20 percent. The huge opportunity is to leverage operational data for more control and visibility across the organization. 

Read the full article in Industry Week.

How Data Can Be Monetized in Core Manufacturing Operations

How Data Can Be Monetized in Core Manufacturing Operations

In general, manufacturing operations collect more than enough data to form a basis for the initial stages of transformation. The challenge is that many may not have a clear idea of how to use it or cannot easily access it because it is locked in legacy systems. And simply accessing that data is not enough – organizations must be able to monetize it.

Read the full article in CIO.

Why Software Will Drive the Smart Factory and the Future of Manufacturing

Why Software Will Drive the Smart Factory and the Future of Manufacturing

The manufacturing industry is seeing a turning-point in its growth and development, moving from decades-old operational processes to new implementations of IoT and connected technology such as smart robotics and industrial systems. A report from Statista reports that the smart manufacturing market is expected to grow to approximately $480 billion USD by 2023, from just a few hundred billion in 2018. As more systems become connected, the industrial and manufacturing industries, as well as the whole supply chain, must continue to mature to give manufacturers a set of tools for optimizing and increasing efficiencies in their connected factories that help them compete in the market and ultimately enable greater innovation.

Read the full article in Manufacturing.net.

Advanced Robotics Versus Practical Robotics

Advanced Robotics Versus Practical Robotics

e these issues. Once a practical application is identified with a big enough market, practical roboticists focus on using the technology at hand and adding more customization to create a solution for automating these tasks. Commercializing robotics helps in advancing the science of robotics. The advanced robotics engineers, without realizing it, are highly dependent on practical roboticists for their future survival.

Read the full article in Forbes.

Interview: Fast Radius’ CEO Lou Rasey on Embracing Industrial Additive Manufacturing

Interview: Fast Radius’ CEO Lou Rasey on Embracing Industrial Additive Manufacturing

Now that 3D printing is moving towards industrial-grade production levels, many companies find themselves excited about the possibilities but not sure how to fully make it part of their operating model. This has created a gap where companies are slow to adopt additive manufacturing. Fast Radius’ CEO Lou Rassey shares his take on industrial additive manufacturing.

Read the full article in 3D Printing Industry.

On-Premises or the Cloud: Which Makes More Sense?

On-Premises or the Cloud: Which Makes More Sense?

In your digital transformation, remember that every plant is different, so you need to find the right balance of local and cloud platforms. When you are choosing a platform to collect and visualize data, make sure the system has the flexibility to meet your particular requirements.

Read the full article in Advanced Manufacturing.

Turning Traditional Automation On Its Head

Turning Traditional Automation On Its Head

Manufacturing automation is trickling down from the massive automotive assembly lines toward the “mom and pop” machine shop. As you take your first look at automation, consider the benefits of and barriers to this technology. Traditional automation requires a large upfront investment in dedicated equipment that takes months or even years to implement. Expanding automated solutions to more manufacturers doesn’t just require a better mousetrap, but also a paradigm shift to break down the old barriers. Systems integrators are creating solutions for manufacturers that reduce initial investment, shorten implementation times and allow for greater flexibility from the get-go.

Read the full article in Advanced Manufacturing.

Accelerating a more sustainable industrial revolution with digital manufacturing

Accelerating a more sustainable industrial revolution with digital manufacturing

According to the World Economic Forum, the value of digital transformations in the Fourth Industrial Revolution is estimated at $100 trillion in the next 10 years alone, across all sectors, industries and geographies. The manufacturing sector, which has long been a driver of global prosperity and economic growth, is key to this transformation.

Additive Manufacturing Industrializes: A Serious Show Shows A Serious Industry

Additive Manufacturing Industrializes: A Serious Show Shows A Serious Industry

Producing large volumes of product reliably, repeatably and affordably is the increasingly-reachable carrot-on-a-stick for 3D printing as improvements are made in hardware speed and quality, design capability in software and widening portfolios of engineering-grade materials suited for manufacturing environments.