Industry 4.0

A look at the latest automation in heavy industries

A look at the latest automation in heavy industries

Children are our future — but so are robots. That’s especially true when it comes to manufacturing and other heavy industries, which now more than ever have to do more with less. We can expect 2019 to be a breakthrough year for robotics, so let’s take a look at some of the reasons why.

The following insight is from BossMagazine.com.

Brewery Uses AI And IoT Technology To Improve The Quality Of Beer

Brewery Uses AI And IoT Technology To Improve The Quality Of Beer

Artificial intelligence (AI) and the internet of things (IoT) are becoming more prominent in the food and beverage industry. In a recent interview, Joe Vogelbacher, president and co-founder of Sugar Creek Brewing, shared how AI and IoT are helping his company.

The insight is from Forbes.com.

How Data Can Be Monetized in Core Manufacturing Operations

How Data Can Be Monetized in Core Manufacturing Operations

In general, manufacturing operations collect more than enough data to form a basis for the initial stages of transformation. The challenge is that many may not have a clear idea of how to use it or cannot easily access it because it is locked in legacy systems. And simply accessing that data is not enough – organizations must be able to monetize it.

Read the full article in CIO.

Five steps to a successful digital transformation

Five steps to a successful digital transformation

What would you do if your market disappeared overnight? It might be a scary proposition to consider what would happen if your customers didn’t buy from you tomorrow, but within the answer lies the start of your digital transformation.

Additive Manufacturing Industrializes: A Serious Show Shows A Serious Industry

Additive Manufacturing Industrializes: A Serious Show Shows A Serious Industry

Producing large volumes of product reliably, repeatably and affordably is the increasingly-reachable carrot-on-a-stick for 3D printing as improvements are made in hardware speed and quality, design capability in software and widening portfolios of engineering-grade materials suited for manufacturing environments.

Are you ready for the smart manufacturing revolution?

Are you ready for the smart manufacturing revolution?

The digital factory will change the nature of manufacturing—from mass production to product customization—and allow companies to respond instantly to changes in customer demand or the inevitable production variation, such as supply disruption. It can lead to gains in productivity, performance, output, and market share as well as better control and visibility in the supply chain, and digital innovation can help manufacturers create capacity to enable more profitable growth.

Industrial robots can create more palatable human jobs

Industrial robots can create more palatable human jobs

eople are willing to take on low-skilled, manual labor positions, and our economic landscape is driving much of that change. In the U.S., employment growth for occupations requiring higher levels of physical skills rose just 18 percent between 1983 and 2015. In comparison, overall employment grew by 50 percent during the same time frame. Robots and other automation technology are filling the gap of workers who are no longer interested in doing the type of hard, manual labor common in industries like manufacturing.

A digital approach to small-batch beer

A digital approach to small-batch beer

Canadian brewer, Sleeman, teamed up with McRae Integration, a Toronto firm that helps factories automate, and Rockwell Automation, a Milwaukee provider of manufacturing technology, to streamline its production process. The need was compelling: Large brewers like Sleeman have been losing market share to craft brands. To compete, they need to boost productivity and increase yields while developing smaller-batch beers.

Today, Sleeman can control the line through a digital console. The new system also automatically assesses which parts of the plant can continue operating while he has stopped one portion to alter the recipe. “All of these small intuitive processes can add up to a significant reduction of the brew-cycle time,” says McRae president Andrew Bentley, who estimates four to eight hours is saved per day.

Digital Is Changing The Economics Of Manufacturing

Digital Is Changing The Economics Of Manufacturing

Digital manufacturing is rapidly changing the fundamentals of how products are developed, scaled and manufactured. By digitizing traditional manufacturing methods, including injection molding and CNC machining, and leveraging newer technologies, like 3-D printing, the industrial internet of things (IIoT) and artificial intelligence (AI), companies are optimizing their supply chains, reducing development cycles, increasing efficiencies, and driving down costs.

Reinventing Machine Maintenance with Remote Monitoring

Reinventing Machine Maintenance with Remote Monitoring

IIoT is transforming the way manufacturers identify problems on the plant floor as the latest wireless solutions address integration challenges. IIoT eliminates data silos, so device-level data is accessible to the entire operations team. It provides valuable insights into machine performance, process inefficiencies and other potential risks. In this smart environment, wireless sensors enable real-time remote monitoring of machine performance. Manufacturers can use the information to increase overall equipment effectiveness (OEE), which is a calculation of manufacturing process efficiency.

Humans Plus Robots: Why the Two Are Better Than Either One Alone

Humans Plus Robots: Why the Two Are Better Than Either One Alone

In their new book, Human + Machine: Reimagining Work in the Age of AI, Paul Daugherty and James Wilson make a compelling case for pairing this particular technology with human capital. In their research, they found that companies that focus on human and machine collaboration create outcomes that are two to more than six times better than those that focus on machine or human alone. For instance, BMW has found that robot/human teams were about 85% more productive than the old assembly line process, where you had industrial robots over on one side of the factory and people working on an old automated assembly line. 

Predicting The Future Of Digital Manufacturing, 2018

Predicting The Future Of Digital Manufacturing, 2018

Capgemini found that the successful manufacturers have mastered the use of data from smart, connected products to build actionable insights. 93% of digitally successful manufacturers have mastered the ability to use data from smart, connected products to gain insights into how they can improve product designs and manufacturing techniques.